How Natural Therapies Can Help Watery Eyes For Your Dog

How To Care For Your Dog's Eyes With These Tips



Does your dog get watery eyes? And do you know what causes it and how to help? Is it even something to worry about?

Like humans, watery eyes for our dogs does usually mean something is wrong. One of the signs of good health for our dogs, is having "bright eyes". So anything that's affecting that should seen by a veterinary surgeon.

A veterinary surgeon will be able to check what the problem is and decide on the best treatment.

But what could be causing weepy eyes for your dog?

6 Reasons Why Your Dog Could Have Watery Eyes



1. Allergies. There's many allergies that can lead to not only skin irritations, but also eye issues. Read more about relieving your dog's allergies and benefits of natural therapies here.

2. Weather. If it's very windy, your dog can get watery or weepy eyes as a result. Likewise, some dogs can find strong sunlight makes their eyes watery.

3. Foreign object. A grass seed is a common cause of watery eyes. They are small, but can create lots of issues. Likewise anything else that shouldn't be near your dogs eyes, but is can create irritation. If you suspect something is in your dog's eye, or has scratched it, then do get veterinary advice asap.

4. Breed related. Some breeds of dogs are more predisposed to eye problems than others. This can be due to the shape of their head. They will need extra care and attention to help ensure they stay happy and healthy.

5. Infections. Your dog can get an eye infection. Sometimes these can occur because there is an irritation in the eye, and then your dog rubs his or her eye. When they rub, they can create soreness and an infection can develop. There's many other possible reasons for an eye infection. So do speak to your veterinary surgeon asap.

6. Other ailments. Watery eyes can be a result of different ailments, such as corneal ulcers or other conditions. So to be sure do get professional veterinary advice.

3 Complementary Therapies To Help Your Dog's Watery Eyes



1. Veterinary Homeopathy - There's literally dozens of homeopathic remedies that are available. The best one will depend on your individual dog and what's causing the problem. And your dog's symptoms. There's many qualified veterinary surgeons who've completed additional training in this complementary therapy. If you need help finding a veterinary homeopath for your dog, please email me.

2. Herbal Supplements and Lotions - There's dozens of herbs that are used for many different reasons. And there are some like Bilberries and Eyebright (Euphrasia) that are excellent for eye health. Seabuckthorn and Turmeric have both been found to have use with some eye conditions.
Your veterinary surgeon will be able to advise on the best for your dog. Choose products from a reputable supplier, a couple of my recommended companies are Dorwest Herbs or Hilton Herbs. You can buy herbs like Eyebright "neat" too, as well as already in a tincture/solution.

3. Nutrition - Some foods are particularly good as antioxidants. And generally help with health. If your dog has an ailment or injury, then helping your dog restore his or her natural equilibrium is possible with some dietary boosts. For instance Blueberries. But others containing omega-3 are good. Find out more about the benefits of fish oils here.

I hope this has given you some ideas on what to look for with your dog's eye care. And also what natural therapies maybe useful.

What Research Is There For Natural Canine Eye Healthcare?


Like help finding a holistic veterinary surgeon or complementary therapist for your animal?

Please email me at info at taranet . co. uk

Please remember that if your horse, dog or other animal is unwell. Or on any kind of medication or other supplement. Then always speak to your Veterinary Surgeon first before using any supplement or therapy. Even natural ones. To avoid any possible issues.

And do you know someone who'd find this helpful? Please share, the more we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural therapies the better! :)

Find out more about other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How To Help Your Pet Have A Healthy Coat This Spring Naturally

How To Help Your Pet and Horse Be Healthy This Spring



Each season of the year brings different challenges to our animal's health. (And opportunities too of course!)

As we enter Spring. Many cats, dogs and horses, and other animals too, will be starting to lose their winter coats.

Known as moulting, this natural process, can make your animal itchy. And of course lots of loose hair! It's completely natural. But what can you do to help?

How To Help Your Pet's Moulting Be Less Itchy!



Groom your animal often. This isn't as easy as it may seem though. For instance, choosing the right brush is essential. Different grooming brushes will be more suitable than others for your animals. For your horse, a traditional dandy brush could be perfect. But you can also buy many other types - such as the Striphair Gentle Groomer, which is more multi-purpose. My donkeys love this.

There's many types of brushes for your dog or cat. The type of coat your pet has will make a difference. A shorter coat will often need a different brush to a pet with longer hair. My dog loves the "Groomi" , although your dog may find another better.

Does your animal enjoy grooming? Not all animals like it, especially on certain parts of their body.

My top tip is to take it slow. If your animal needs to get used to the experience, then practice first of all with your hand. Stroking your animal for a few minutes each day, before adding the brush.

Then use the brush for a couple of minutes every day and build the time up slow. This may sound like it's all going to take a long time? Would it be quicker to go to a dog or pet groomer? If your animal dislikes grooming, this would be passing the 'problem' on. Sometimes though a professional may seem to get better results because they're confident.

If you're not confident, this could be for many reasons. But take the pressure off yourself! Grooming should be a chance to increase your bond with your animal.

There's different complementary therapies that you could use to help.

1. Aromatherapy. Or zoopharmacognosy as it's sometimes known. Research suggests that lavender can help to reduce stress in horses and dogs. Appropriate use of lavender as an essential oil, can be worth trying. Read more here. And it can be useful for people too in relieving your stress!
2. Homeopathy. There's dozens of different homeopathic remedies. Including some used to reduce excitability and anxiety. Your veterinary surgeon trained in homeopathy will be able to advise on the best one(s) to use.
3. Bach Flower Remedies. The 38 different remedies in this system (plus the separate Rescue Remedy combination remedy) all help with the emotions. Can be used with animals and with people! The right one(s) can be used to help relieve stress and anxiety. There are trained Bach Flower Remedy practitioners for animals you can contact. Or take a course with the Bach Centre to learn yourself more about this amazing natural system.

How To Stop Ticks Affecting Your Pet's Skin Health This Spring


Don't forget to check for ticks. These small critters, can have a significant impact on skin health. Although they can be found all year around. There sometimes can seem to be more of them about in the spring (and summer).

So don't dismiss itchiness with your pet being due to moulting. Do check for ticks, as these are best identified and sorted sooner rather than later! They not only can cause severe itching. But also skin infections and more severe ailments such as Lyme Disease (and others). Read this post to learn more about helping your pet naturally from the trauma of ticks.

3 Top Tips To Beat Your Pet's Spring Allergies


Allergies from plants as they blossom and bud can cause irritation. Not only to airways, but also laying on your animals coat can create itchiness. This itchiness can be so bad that your animal scratches or rubs so much that hair falls out. Yes really - research shows that animals are as affected as humans by pollen allergies.

Here's 3 tips to naturally help your animal.

1. Bee Pollen - this natural supplement can be used to help the immune system and so improve the immune response to allergens. Read more here.

2. Aromatherapy - different essential oils can be beneficial to alleviate allergies. Including chamomile and peppermint. Read more here.

3. Seabuckthorn - this natural plant has many potential health and wellbeing benefits for your pet or horse. Read more here.

Lastly, if you're concerned that your pet or horse (or other animal), has an allergy. Then don't delay in identifying this and speaking to your vet. Skin irritations not only can make the coat look in poor condition. But also cause distress. Delaying treatment can lead to more health issues developing.

Remember.. With any ailment it's important to get Veterinary advice before using a therapy to help. Consider too that what works with one animal may not necessarily work with another.

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How To Help Your Pet or Horse's Health With Ashwagandha

How Can Ashwagandha Help Your Pet's Health?



First of all what is Ashwagandha?

This is a herb used for centuries to promote health. Also sometimes known as Indian Ginseng or Winter Cherry. It originates from Asia and Africa and is an evergreen shrub.

Ashwagandha is an important herb in Ayurvedic medicine. In fact it's one of the most used herbs.

So what is Ayurvedic medicine?

This is a holistic system of medicine used for thousands of years. The Ayurveda system originates from India.

Ayurveda translates from the Sanskrit langauge, as “science (ved) of life (ayur)”

It's based on the principles that the mind, body and spirit are all inter-related. In fact they must be balanced to promote whole health. And so is "holistic".

Why Use Ashwagandha For My Pet or Horse's Health?



Generally it's used to help improve:

  • Energy
  • Health
  • Longevity

Veterinary research (1) suggests that Ashwagandha root extract has several benefits. Including potent hemopoietic, antioxidant, adaptogenic, and immune-stimulant properties

Many different animals can use ashwagandha, from small animals such as your dog, to horses, chickens and others.

Your holistic veterinary surgeon will consider whether ashwagandha herb maybe helpful for your animal.

Where Can I Buy Ashwagandha For My Pet or Horse?



Several holistic animal health supplements contain Ashwagandha. Including those from the international company Hilton Herbs. You'll find it as an ingredient alongside other herbs as it's known as an adaptogenic.

Why is an adaptogenic useful?

An adaptogenic herb is one that helps the body counteract stress. Also strengthening the immune system.

Veterinary Research Demonstrating Benefits of Ashwagandha



1. Adaptogenic and Immunomodulatory Activity of Ashwagandha Root Extract: An Experimental Study in an Equine Model. (Journal - Frontiers in Veterinary Science , Volume 7, 2020, https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fvets.2020.541112

2. Nabi, Showkat & Wani, A.R. & Dey, Sahadeb. (2014). Therapeutic effect of ashwagandha ( Withania somnifera L.) in liver dysfunction of old dogs. Applied Biological Research. 16. 232. 10.5958/0974-4517.2014.00015.9.

3. Effect Of Feeding Ashwagandha And Enzyme Alone Andin Combination On The Carcass Traits Of Broiler Chicks (2015)

In Conclusion

Ashwagandha is a herb that's been used to help a variety of animals for many years. And can potentially have many benefits. Especially if used as part of a holistic approach to maintaining good health.


Like help finding a holistic veterinary surgeon or complementary therapist for your animal?
Please email me at info at taranet . co. uk

Please remember that if your horse, dog or other animal is unwell. Or on any kind of medication or other supplement. Then always speak to your Veterinary Surgeon first before using any supplement or therapy. Even natural ones. To avoid any possible issues.

And do you know someone who'd find this helpful? Please share, the more we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural therapies the better! :)

Find out more about other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How Red Light Therapy Can Help Your Pet

Can light make a difference to your pet's health?



The short answer is yes, it can! In this post find out more about one type of light therapy. Red Light Therapy is a non-invasive way to help animal health.

I discovered the benefits of Red Light when my own horse had a lameness. This prompted me to learn more about how it can help animal health. And I'm now a professionally trained practitioner using red light therapy to help pets and horses.

There's a couple of methods of this therapy often used to help animals.

1. Torches (PBM for Pets)



When using Torches, the process is called Photobiomodulation (PBM). PBM means moculating the biological processes of the body with Light energy(photons)

The application can help:

  • Reduce pain and inflammation
  • Increase circulation
  • Stimulate cellular repair.

Unlike medical laser procedures, PBM is not a surgical or thermal mechanism, but rather a photochemical effect. This means that the light is absorbed and exerts a chemical change.

Photopuncture, this is known as this because torches activate the acupoints in the body, similar to acupuncture.

To activate a point, it takes as little as 5 seconds per point.

There are several signs of releases of energy shifts in animals

  • Blinking
  • Licking
  • Short spasms
  • Stance changes
  • Yawning
  • Purring
  • Passing gas
  • Stretching

2. Light Pads For Animal Health



These products help animals as well as humans. Light therapy pads can be placed onto your pet to soothe.

I love working with animals because they are very responsive and you see a change when you are working on them. Each session runs about 30 minutes in time.

How Many Sessions Are Needed To Help My Animal's Health with Light Therapy?



Depending on the issue, some need regular sessions, once per week to once every four weeks.

For other issues, you can do a couple sessions and the animal is great for months.

You can use lights for pretty well everything from skin issues to internal issues. Your veterinary surgeon can advise, and be sure to use a professionally qualified practitioner for your pet or horse.


Is There Any Research Evidencing Benefits of Red Light Therapy For Pets?



Yes there is! Check out these links below



Please remember…..
that if your horse, dog or other animal is unwell. Or on any kind of medication or other supplement. Then always speak to your Veterinary Surgeon first before using any supplement or therapy. Even natural ones. To avoid any possible issues.

And do you know someone who'd find this helpful? Please share, the more we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural therapies the better! :)

Find out more about other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About The Authors

This is a guest post by Shelley Leach, professionally qualified light therapy for animals practitioner, who is owner of "Shell's Light 4 Life" based in Alberta, Canada.

And edited by Suzanne Harris who is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

Love These Tips On How To Care For Your Elderly Bunny

Caring for the Elderly Bunny



Rabbits develop limitations as they grow older. As your rabbit grows older, it may develop health problems, lose energy, and have different appetites. An elderly rabbit is only 7 years old. You want to care for your pet, but how you care for it in its prime age will determine this.

You'll need to adjust to an old rabbit's new metabolism, reduced mobility, and grooming issues if you want to care for him. It's possible that you'll need to give it dry baths, add more litter boxes, provide more water, or change its food. You'll need to take more drastic measures if your bunny has age-related problems like blindness, deafness, kidney problems, incontinence, sore hocks, or arthritis. This may affect how you interact with or feed the rabbit after medical intervention, as well as how the rabbit's enclosure is set up.

Even a healthy rabbit will need to make lifestyle changes. This may entail bringing its food and water closer to where it sleeps. It may require softer or warmer bedding. To help with joint problems, ramps may require a lower incline. Your bunny may crave more attention or require low-impact exercise. You can buy an X-pen for your rabbit’s exercise.

Obesity, dental problems, and other health issues in older rabbits can all be traced back to their diet. Obesity in senior rabbits can cause heart disease, arthritic flare-ups, respiratory symptoms, sore hocks, and liver disease (fatty liver), all of which can exacerbate any other illnesses your rabbit may develop. On the other hand, some older rabbits may have difficulty maintaining their weight. This could be the result of digestive issues, dental issues, or other illnesses. You may also face issues if you have decided to adopt a bunny who has experienced domestic abuse.

Rabbits are considered elderly when they reach a certain age.



Rabbits are generally considered elderly when they reach the age of 6-8 years, with an average life expectancy of around 10-12 years. Larger rabbits with a shorter lifespan may begin to show signs of aging as young as four years old.

Symptoms of advanced age



As rabbits grow older, they will begin to show physical differences. Don't be surprised if your rabbit's physique and energy level change slowly over time, just like humans. Any sudden changes, on the other hand, could be a sign of illness, and you should consult a rabbit-savvy veterinarian.

  • Fur is thinning
Your rabbit's fur will start to thin. It will be most noticeable in areas where there is less fur to begin with, such as the ears and eyes.

  • Muscle mass has shrunk
Rabbits naturally lose their youthful muscles as they grow older, and they become weaker overall.

  • Loss of weight
The rabbit will begin to lose weight as their muscle mass declines.

  • They are less active
Rabbits in their senior years will, understandably, be less active. They'll sleep more and not zoom around nearly as much.

  • Ears are scaling
It may appear that the rabbit has a small amount of dandruff on its ears, which is itchy for the rabbit.

Taking Care of an Elderly Rabbit



Rabbits slow down as they get older. This could be due to a lack of energy or mobility problems like:

  • Lethargy
  • Obesity
  • Joint pain
  • Arthritis

Each of these has its own set of issues. Make changes to your rabbit's environment to help it move more freely.

  • Keep things close at hand. Make sure your rabbit has access to its litter box, food, and water, as previously stated.
  • Make the bedding softer. If your bunny has a gentle, supportive place to rest, joint pain can be greatly reduced.
  • Reduce the angle of the ramps. An aging rabbit will find it much more difficult to jump, run, or climb. After all, the rabbit's joints are less supple, and the rabbit has less energy.
  • Increase the number of litter boxes. If your bunny is running around the house, it may not have the energy to make the trip to the litter box. Instead, scatter a few around your house. An elderly bunny will appreciate not having to go to the bathroom in more than one room.
  • Anti-slip mats are available. Hardwood or tile floors are difficult to navigate for any bunny. A fall, on the other hand, is dangerous for an elderly bunny. Anti-slip mats should be placed near ramps, furniture, and other areas where bunnies require traction.

Care for Senior Rabbits on a Day-to-Day Basis



It's fantastic if your rabbit doesn't get sick as it gets older. Its day-to-day care, on the other hand, will not be the same. You can ensure the bunny's health and happiness by making a few changes to the routine.

Veterinary Examinations
An elderly rabbit, whether or not it has health problems, requires more frequent visits to the veterinarian. Once it reaches the age of six, it should have a full physical examination, including blood tests, at least once a year. The blood results accomplish four things:

  1. Your rabbit's health is constantly monitored by your veterinarian.
  2. Early detection of genetic defects or diseases
  3. Early detection of developing conditions, such as arthritis, allows treatment to begin.
  4. Allows you to talk about dietary changes for the rabbit. This is especially true as the animal's appetite and nutritional requirements change.

Exercise
While older rabbits may be less active, they still require exercise to stay healthy.

High-power activities are not good for its joints. You can, however, schedule play sessions to keep the bunny active. This could consist of a few minutes of playing and exercising with your bunny as they require the right kind of movement to ensure that their muscle mass isn’t getting weaker along with making sure that they get the proper nutrition.

The above blog has discussed the basics of how you should take care of a rabbit. If you have an older bunny you need to put in extra efforts to ensure their life is long and safe.


Finally, do you know someone who'd find this helpful? Please share, the more we can spread awareness of the benefits of natural therapies the better! :)

Find out more about other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About The Author
This is a guest post by Esther Praag Phd

This post has been selected as part of Twinkl Pets campaign and is featured in the ‘How to Take Care of a Pet - Essential Tips & Info’ post.