Is Devils Claw Worth Trying For Your Horse?

Does This Natural Arthritis Remedy Help Horses?



As a horse owner, you know what it's like. Someone on your livery yard will know about a remedy for different ailments. With horses often having a variety of health conditions. There can be lots of ailments. I remember when a yard manager suggested Devil's Claw as being a way to ease stiffness. I thought if it's herbal then yes I'm interested. But what a name, what is it?!

Sure enough when I went to the tack shop, I found some there. I bought some, thinking it's worth a try. Tara had arthritis diagnosed in her neck, so I was keen to try lots of things to keep her supple. The labelling on the liquid supplement said it would help relieve stiffness. So the yard manager may be on to something, when she suggested it to me.

I mentioned it to my Veterinary Surgeon. Who also said it might be useful to try. But of course couldn't say it would definitely help. But many veterinary surgeon's are open to more natural options. As of course some medication can have side-effects if used on a long-term or permanent basis.

So what is Devil’s Claw?



It’s a plant native to some desert areas of Africa. It's understood that people in these areas have had Devil’s Claw as a “tea” for hundreds of years. Mainly to help with arthritic ailments.

Animals also can have it. Usually as a liquid supplement or as a dried herb. Horses are the animals most likely to have it as a supplement.

You may've heard of "No Bute"? This is based on Devil's Claw. And is an easy way to give the benefits of Devil's Claw.

Does it work with helping arthritis?



Yes! Research into its effects for humans. Shows that Devil’s Claw does have an anti-inflammatory effect. Get more research information here. There's limited veterinary research into its use. But 2018 research shows (click here to see), that it's safe for use with horses. And that it's used a lot with horses.

Remember though that quality is essential! Harvesting and production varies a lot. This can make a difference to the effectiveness of the herb when it reaches your animal. Use a high quality brand. Many leading animal health supplement companies supply Devil’s Claw. And should be able to confirm the quality of their product.

Is Devil's Claw safe to use?



There are possible side effects with Devil’s Claw. But this is the same as with many other supplements. So before using, it’s always advised to check with your Veterinary Surgeon first. Especially if your horse is on other medication. Or taking any other supplements. It's usually advised NOT to use with pregnant mares.

If you compete your horse and need to worry about complying with anti-doping policies. Then DO check with your Veterinary Surgeon for clarity about withdrawal times.

Lastly……did it help Tara?

Yes I think so! Tara had it as a supplement for several months, and it seemed to help…. I did then discover Forever Living Products and switched Tara onto one of their supplements for mobility, which made sense as I started selling the products. And I can't sell something that I don't use and love!

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore how complementary therapies can help your animal!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business and social media coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

Your Horse Through Rose(hip)-tinted Glasses

Give Your Horse's Diet A Natural Boost With Rosehips


I guess we should have been tipped off by the way our horses seek out these pretty red and tangy fruits by the side of the road. Who knew? They did. Obviously.

Rosehip has been used as a natural anti-inflammatory and antioxidant for hundreds of years. However, it is only in recent times that its value in the treatment of animals has been explored by us humans.

Rosehip has been shown helpful in very practical ways in the lives of horses:

  • swelling and heat in limbs
  • clicky joints
  • hoof abscesses and sensitivity
  • unhealthy gut
  • dull coats and manes

and more. To understand why, we have to dig a bit into the actual mechanics of action of this magical fruit.

Rosehip As An Anti-Inflammatory



Inflammation is a natural response to trauma or infection in the body and is needed for healing to take place. However, often times the inflammatory response overreacts and actually harms the healthy tissue in the surrounding areas. That is where anti-inflammatories have a role to play.

Rosehip contains an active agent, galactolipids, that calms down this inflammatory response by attaching itself to the rescue-type inflammation cells rushing to the situation. In way of illustration, you may say that this extra baggage makes the inflammation carriers too big to pass through the window of the burning building, thereby effectively controlling the inflammatory response.

Not only do these galactolipids fight inflammation, they also actively offer cartilage protection, which is of course even more valuable as our horses grow older and start to show signs of arthritis. This study by researchers in Switzerland can shed more light on this phenomenon.

Rosehip As An Antioxidant For Your Horse


Every day your horse’s body comes under attack from potentially dangerous molecules called ‘free radicals’. There is no foul play here. Free radicals are created in the normal bodily processes of producing energy and fighting infection. This being said, these little rascals multiply exponentially whenever the body needs more energy, i.e. during exercise, or after injury. They can also increase when your horse gets ill, are exposed to molds and pollens, pollutants or even excess radiation from the sun.

Which is exactly when rosehip’s antioxidative properties saves the day!

Being high in vitamin C, rosehip acts as free radical scavengers, neutralizing these molecules to prevent them from causing oxidative stress and damage to the body.

To read more on the effects of oxidative stress on your horse, this paper by Drs David Marlin and Cath Dunnett may prove extremely insightful.

The Story Behind Our Elite Equine Rosehip



Our 100% organically certified rosehip is picked by hand high in the mountains of Lesotho, southern Africa, by more than 3,500 from the indigenous Basotho tribes in the area, small entrepreneurs in their own right.

The rosehip fruit is collected and bought from them at a fair price, which our Rainforest Alliance and UZT Certification can attest to.

The seed is extracted from the fruit to cold press the organic rosehip oil used in cosmetics, while the rest of the fruit is dried and then cut up into teabag size for human consumption, or in a powdered form to make up our Elite Equine 100% Organic Rosehip Supplement.

To meet our extended rosehip family, visit https://eliteequineuk.com/2019/05/01/meet-our-rosehip-family/ for a short media clip on the difference rosehip has made in the lives of our harvesters.

Elite Equine 100% Organic Rosehip Supplement



Understanding the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative value of rosehip makes Elite Equine’s application wide and extremely valuable.

  • Inflamed joints in sport horses
  • Coughing horses
  • Addressing leg deformities in young foals
  • Using rosehip as a poultice

This is only a few of the instances in which the powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of Elite Equine may make a difference. To read even more, please visit our website at Elite Equine and look out for the FRIDAY FEATURE page.

Dosing Guidelines


When starting out on Elite Equine, a loading month is recommended.

  • For the first month, add 10g per 100kg of horse weight, once daily, to their food.
  • Thereafter, only add 5g per 100kg of horse weight, once daily, to their food.

For an average sized horse of 500kg, 1 x 1kg tub of Elite Equine should then last just over a month and currently retails at £38.

For a handy guide on how to weigh your horse without a horse-sized scale, visit the FREE DOWNLOADS page at https://eliteequineuk.com

Horses love the tangy taste of our Elite Equine and you should not have any problems – even your picky-eaters will most probably jump in!

However, please stick to the dosing guide. If left to their own resources, your ponies will finish it all in one go. And too much vitamin C is never good for horse tummies!

Contact Elite Equine


We pride ourselves on our personal service. To support this, we have now started to personalize our Elite Equine tubs with your horse’s name, which you can supply upon ordering.
Delivery to Mainland UK is still FREE.

Touches like these and the accessibility to our team, make us proud to be a small business.

You are welcome to contact me at maxie@rosehipco.com if you have any further questions or queries.

About The Author
This is a guest post by Maxie Heppell, Head of Business Development: Europe at Elite Equine

What About Using CBD As A Natural Remedy for Horses?

Naturally Healthy CBD For Your Horse



CBD has come to the forefront in recent years as an amazing natural healer for both humans and animals.

More and more people are giving CBD to their horses to help with a host of symptoms such as chronic pain, arthritis, anxiety, chronic stress, digestive health, immune system bolstering and the list goes on.

Just like we humans, horses have an endocannabinoid system in their bodies. It is the master communication system that regulates the body's systems and it's ability to gain homeostasis or balance. The surge in interest and popularity of CBD has to do with cannabidiol (CBD) which is a potent compound found in the hemp plant.

How Are CBD Products Different?



There are many qualities of CBD to be found around the marketplace, so you want to first and foremost consider the quality and source of the CBD. CBD oils have been found to be very useful yet there is a newcomer to the market - CBD fluid. The difference is in the type of cannibis plant it is extracted from, the way it is extracted, the dosing and the cost.

As CBD oils are extracted, the buik of the plant is destroyed during the process by the use of heat, chemicals, butane, critical Co2 or alcohol. Many of the oils are extracted from industrial hemp which is also used to make clothing, rope, etc. Look for a product that is NOT from industrial hemp.

As the extraction process moves forward, only a very small amount of CBD is able to be obtained and it is normally an isolate, or a single component of the entire host of medicinal properties available in the plant. Terpines and other flavonoids are then added to that small amount of extracted CBD, as well as carrier oils to be able to fill the bottle. The bulk of the medicinal properties is found in the flower of the plant. The majority of CBD in oils come from the leaves and stems due to the extraction process killing the flower.

What's Your Horse Made Of?



Another thing to ask yourself - is your body or your horse's body mostly made of oil or water? The answer is obvious, it's water. Water and oil do not mix. So using a CBD oil, though beneficial, is not as bioavailable to the body and requires a much higher dose than does using a fluid. Many CBD oils are labeled as water soluble, even though when dropped in a glass of water, they clearly are not. They are however allowed to be labeled that because at least one of the added ingredients in the bottle is water soluble. If you drop the CBD fluid in a glass of water you will be able to watch it disperse throughout the water as opposed to balling up and floating to the top.

With CBD fluid, a patented and proprietary extraction process is used that does not require the use of heat or chemicals, thereby preserving the whole host of CBDs, terpenes and flavonoids available from the flower. It is called the entourage effect and could be compared to a team. With the oils, you get a single star player, but with the fluid, you get the whole team, which provides the endocannabinoid system (ECS) everything it needs to be the most beneficial at addressing the health concerns.

Dosage of CBD For Your Horse?



Now, what about dosing. With humans, a normal dose of CBD oils is 1-2 dropperfuls, which you hold under your tongue for a long as you can before swallowing it With the CBD Fluid, the dose is 2 drops! The reason for the difference is again because in that fluid you have the whole team and not just the star player.

Many veterinarians and horse owners have seen substantial improvements in their horse's health and emotional concerns. Interestingly enough, even though a horse is very large, it's metabolism is very slow so they need lower doses and less frequent doses than other animals. You would start with a low dose and gradually increase the amount and frequency. It is important to consult with your veterinarian as to how much and how often to give it to your horse.

There are many wonderful articles regarding CBD and horses online. My hope is that this information will have been useful to you as you consider using this amazing natural alternative for your horse's care.

Where Can CBD Fluid Be Purchased?



Currently the CBD Fluid which is called Süthe, is currently available for purchase in the United States and Puerto Rico. However it has been used all over the world, prior to it becoming legal in the United States in December of 2018.

This particular product contains no additives to cause harm or toxicity.

For more information about the Süthe CBD fluid, please feel free to contact me at dianafletcher78@gmail.com Or check out the website www.brizopure.com/Newbeginnings

About The Author

This is a guest post by Diana Fletcher of www.brizopure.com/Newbeginnings

How To Stop Your Pet Getting Scared Of Loud Noises - A Holistic Approach

Natural Noise Solutions For Your Pet



Fireworks, thunderstorms and parties. These are some of the things that can be noisy and whilst maybe fun for people. Can terrify our cats or dogs. You can of course get medication from your veterinary surgeon to help calm your animal. Or even move them to another location - BUT there are natural ways you can help.

Here's some ideas of a few holistic therapies that can help

Essential Oil Therapy for Animals



Pure plant essential oils are popular to help a range of animal ailments. Including emotional issues.

Usually essential oils are "offered" to the animal, and if he or she wants it they will sniff it, and inhale the aroma. This is often called "self-selection". And so an animal should never be forced to have the essential oil therapy.

You can also apply some essential oils to the animal's body - by gentle massage.

Lavender is popular. And there has been research to prove its effectiveness. (see here) But there's also several other different essential oils that you can use for anxiety and stress. Including for that caused by loud noises such as fireworks and thunderstorms.

In the first instance, your Veterinary Surgeon may advise you on what to try. Or have a consultation with a professionally qualified zoopharmacognosy practitioner. Who can provide advice and guidance on what essential oils to use.

All sorts of animals can benefit from essential oils. From small pets to larger livestock, such as horses, cattle or even llamas!

Bach Flower Remedies For Animals



There are 38 different Bach Flower Remedies. Comprising plant, mineral, water and flower essences. Many people may have heard of "Rescue Remedy". And although this is often very useful for helping relieving the anxiety of stressful situations. There are many other Bach Flower Remedies that can help - such as Mimulus or Rock Rose.

Usually Bach Flower Remedies come in small bottles with a pipette. It's important never to put the pipette into the animal's mouth. Instead, put a couple of drops onto a treat, food or into your animal's water. Or, if you're not sure that your animal will take the remedy. Then apply it to their paws so that they lick it off.

There are many Bach Flower Remedy practitioners trained in working with animals. So it maybe useful to have a consultation with a trained practitioner to ensure your animal experiences the best possible results.

For help locating a practitioner near you, please get in contact with me by emailing info@taranet.co.uk.

Massage For Pets



Massage benefits all animals. Whether they be your rabbit, dog, cat, horse or other animal! Although massage helps mobility problems. Massage can also help a range of emotional problems. As it can be a very relaxing technique and so help "take the edge" off of stressful situations.

As with any therapy, it's important to know what you're doing, to get the best out of massage. So if you've not completed any training yourself. Do let your animal have a massage session with professional therapist. For help locating a therapist, do email me here at Taranet.

Discover more information on helping your pet cope with loud noises, using a holistic approach at my advice page here

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore how complementary therapies can help your animal!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

Benefits of Cranberries For Your Pet

What Are Cranberries?


Cranberries are a fruit that is native to North America. They've been described as a "super food". This is because they have a high vitamin content (notably vitamin C, vitamin A and vitamin K), plus contain an antioxidant (proanthocyanidins - (PACs)), which is thought to help prevent a range of ailments.

Historically, Native Americans are believed to have used cranberries to help treat bladder and urinary infections.

Can Cats and Dogs Eat Cranberries?



Yes they can! Dogs and cats have eaten them for many years as have horses. But they don't always taste very pleasant - as can be bitter. So choosing a supplement that contains them maybe a better way of letting your animal enjoy their potential benefits (e.g one of my Forever Aloe supplements contains cranberries).

Is There Any Evidence of Cranberries Helping Pet Health?



Yes some research has taken place to explore whether they can be helpful - this has included (click on each below to read):


Cranberries are popular with people for special meals - like with thanksgiving, see this National Geographic article for more information on their fascinating history.

As with any medicine, food, herbal supplement, etc - for some people and animals it will help. And for others it may not. Your veterinary surgeon should always examine your cat, dog or horse and decide on the most appropriate treatment plan. And do ask them if they think cranberries could be worth a try!

Like to know more about my Aloe Berry Nectar supplement? Email me at info@taranet.co.uk

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore complementary animal therapies!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

Why Bee Pollen Can Help Your Horse

Supercharge Your Horse's Health With Bee Pollen!



So what is Bee Pollen?


Bees gather and bring pollen back to their hives for food. Without pollen, plants, trees and flowers could not exist; even we depend on it.

Bee pollen provides a wide spectrum of essential nutrients. Each is required to maintain perfect health. These includes:

  • all vitamins of the B-complex and vitamin C. Since these are water soluble, they should be taken daily.
  • Vitamins D, E, K, and beta-carotene (vitamin A).
  • It's a rich source of numerous minerals, (with calcium and phosphorous in an almost perfect 1:1 ratio), enzymes and co-enzymes, plant-source fatty acids, carbohydrates and proteins.
  • Plus 22 amino acids - including all eight ‘essential’ amino acids which the body cannot manufacture for itself.*

Should my horse (or me) take a Bee Pollen supplement?



Possibly.

If you or your animals are allergic to honey, then it'd be a no - by its nature Bee Pollen will not be suitable for anyone with a honey allergy.

A multi-vitamin and multi-mineral supplement could be a useful addition to you or your horse's diet.

But please seek professional medical or veterinary advice before using any supplement to find out if it's likely to be of any benefit to you.

Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle.

If you or your horses are pregnant, taking any medications or under medical/veterinary supervision, please consult a doctor or healthcare professional or veterinary surgeon before use. Do not exceed the recommended daily dose.

Are Bee Pollen supplement's all the same?


In short, no. As with any supplement buy the best quality that you can - it does make a difference!

Bees collect pollen from different plants which also will have grown in different environmental conditions depending on where they are.
(E.g. that's why manuka honey - which you may have heard of - only comes from Australia or New Zealand, due to the Leptospermum scoparium plant which bees produce manuka honey from, only being native to those countries).

I sell Forever Bee Pollen. This is gathered from the blossoms that blanket remote high desert regions. This supplement’s ingredients are fresh and potent; it includes both honey and royal jelly. Humans can take it as a supplement, as can many animals including horses and dogs.

*

Bee pollen has been the subject of a variety of scientific research, including:



  1. Komosinska-Vassev, K., Olczyk, P., Kaźmierczak, J., Mencner, L., & Olczyk, K. (2015). Bee Pollen: Chemical Composition and Therapeutic Application. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : eCAM, 2015, 297425. http://doi.org/10.1155/2015/297425
  2. Guiné, Raquel. (2015). Bee Pollen: Chemical Composition and Potential Beneficial Effects on Health. Current Nutrition & Food Science. 11. 301-308. 10.2174/1573401311666150630181615.
  3. Witold Kędzierski,Iwona Janczarek,Sylwestr Kowalik,Monika Jamioł,Tatiana Wawak,Grzegorz Borsuk,Monika Przetacznik (2020) Bee Pollen Supplementation to Aged Horses Influences Several Blood Parameters (Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, 2020)

Like to know more? Email me at info@taranet.co.uk

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

Stop Effects of Arthritis For Your Animal With Holistic Therapies

How Complementary Therapies Can Help Animal Arthritis



Osteoarthritis is an ailment that not only affects people, but our animals, large or small too. There's many natural and holistic ways to help manage this condition. Either alongside or instead of conventional medicine. (Depending on the severity of the symptoms).

In this post get tips on caring for your animals who have arthritis.

What Causes Arthritis?

Osteoarthritis commonly occurs when animals (or people) get older. As a result of 'wear and tear' on the joints through a lifetime of exercise and movement. However, it can also occur in younger animals - often as a result of trauma, such as from an accident of some kind.

Many symptoms of arthritis are similar to that of other ailments. So it's important to get a proper veterinary diagnosis to ensure that it's arthritis. And not something else.

So What Complementary Therapies Can Help Your Animal's Arthritis?



There's many therapies that can help our animals with arthritis, popular ones include:

  • Physiotherapy
  • Bowen Therapy
  • Massage
  • Hydrotherapy
  • Aromatherapy (or zoopharmacognosy)

Also if your animal is struggling 'emotionally' or 'spiritually'. Then therapies such as Reiki, Bach Flower Remedies and Radionics do help

What Other Holistic Ways Are There To Help Animals With Arthritis?



  • Think about your animals lifestyle. Is he or she getting enough exercise? Or the right type of exercise?
  • Does your animal need to wear a rug/blanket - or a different type of one (if they already use one)?
  • Where does your animal eat his/her food? Does the 'feeding station'/bowl need to be higher or lower, or a different place to make it more accessible?
  • Could your dog use some help to get in/out of the car? You could get a harness (Orvis.com do great harnesses, to help front and rear ends), or get a ramp.
  • If your horse goes out/about in a horsebox, is the ramp too steep, would a different one be more helpful?

Read more about how holistic approaches can help benefit animals with arthritis in my advice page here.

Listen to episode 12 of The Tara Podcast for a quick overview to helping animals with arthritis.


Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore how complementary therapies can help your animal!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How Clicker Training Can Help Your Dog or Horse

Gentle Training For Your Dog, Horse Or Other Animal


There's often many different views on how to train animals - whether that be our dogs, horses or any animal. To me, a gentle and natural approach has got to be the best. Remember being gentle doesn't mean it's not effective!

In this post i'm looking at why Clicker Training is useful.

What is Clicker Training?



Clicker training is a way of using positive reinforcement to train your animal. It's used to help dogs, horses and other animals too. It works by your dog (or other animal) learning to understand that the sound of the click means "that's right". And so a positive treat is coming. (This positive treat is often food).

Why Clicker Training?



There are two main reasons why using a click rather than your voice can be helpful.

  1. The tone and pitch of your voice varies depending on how you're feeling. This can make you (no matter how hard you try) inconsistent.
  2. If you use the clicker immediately, it means your dog (or other animal) gets a clear and consistent signal. Using your voice can take a few seconds longer.

Remember in training it's better to be quick to reward good behaviour. Then your dog (or other animal) can associate the reward with the action.

Why Reward Good Behaviour?



Rewarding the right behaviour means your dog (or other animal) is more likely to repeat it. So looks for ways that he or she can offer that behaviour so they get a treat. This makes training more interesting and less difficult to understand.

REMEMBER: The click must ALWAYS mean that your animal will immediately get a reward. So the golden rule is: every time you click, give your pet a treat, even if you clicked at the wrong time.


What is a Clicker?



A clicker is a small plastic box that you hold in your hand. With a metal tongue that you push with your thumb to make the "click" sound.

What Does Clicker Training For Animals Look Like?



Here's some links and clips of Clicker Training for dogs - have a look, could it help your dog or a friend or relative's?

Dog's Trust


Blue Cross


Have you tried using clicker training with one of your animals (it's not just used with dogs!)? How did you find it? Remember as with anything, what is helpful for one dog may not suit another.

There are many dog and horse trainers. And even therapists who use clicker training as one way to help animals.

For help getting more advice on clicker training for your dog, please email me here at Taranet - info@taranet.co.uk

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How To Use Bach Flower Remedies To Train Your Dog

Train Your Dog Naturally



There's often many different views on how to train animals. Whether that be our dogs, horses or any animal. I believe in taking as gentle and natural approach as possible. As being gentle doesn't mean it's not effective!

In this article find some tips to help train dogs using holistic approaches. Here I'm focusing on Bach Flower Remedies.

What are Bach Flower Remedies?



This system of remedies was developed by Dr Edward Bach in the early 20th century. It uses a range of plants to help balance emotions and assist with negative mental states. In total there are 38 different remedies, plus a combination emergency remedy often called "Rescue Remedy".

Are they used widely?

Yes, Bach Flower Remedies are used throughout the world for people and for animals.

How can Bach Flower Remedies help my dog with training?



Although there are 38 different remedies, it's no use giving lots of them at once or to use them randomly hoping for the best! To get the best benefits of Bach Flower Remedies you need to understand the underlying emotion/state of mind.

For example, if a dog is over-enthusiastic and 'on-the-go' all the time with a 'purpose' (perhaps a sheepdog who can never stop herding!), then Vervain could be a useful remedy. Whereas the remedy Impatiens can be helpful for dogs who also always 'on-the-go', but who get fed up and irritated with those who are going at a slower pace.

To understand the Bach Flower Remedy system, it can be useful to complete a Level 1 introductory course (they are available widely, including correspondence from The Bach Centre), or have a consultation with a Bach Flower Remedy for animals practitioner.

What do Bach Flower Remedies involve?



The remedies are in liquid form and can be given on a treat to your dog, or even putting a bit on his/her paw so that they can lick it off. Under no circumstances offer them the remedy from the bottle or using the pipette as it could get broken, and they could get the wrong amount.

Like more information?
1. See more with this video clip from Toro Holistic Health Centre


2. Read this article from the Integrated Veterinary Care Journal

Remember.. With any issue it's important to get professionally qualified help.
There's many qualified Bach Flower Remedies practitioners around the world. Always seek their help first, to avoid the remedies being used incorrectly. Or complete a training course yourself. As I mentioned earlier, The Bach Centre have a Level One online course or face-to-face training you complete. For more information please email me or visit https://www.bachcentre.com

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

Gentle Training Tips For Your Dog

How Tellington Ttouch Can Be Used To Help Train Your Dog



For any of us who are dog lovers, we want our dogs to be happy and healthy and to keep safe. So effective training is important to help us achieve that.

What is Tellington Ttouch?



This training approach was developed by animal expert, Linda Tellington-Jones Phd (Hon). It's based on the principles of cooperation and respect for animals and their people.

Tellington Ttouch is known as an approach to help improve behaviour and develop learning skills for your dog. So that you both have an improved connection. There are four components:

  • Gentle body work called Tellington Ttouch
  • Movement exercises
  • Specific harnesses and other equipment
  • Intention with the realisation that you can 'change your mind and change your animal'.

Is Tellington Ttouch Used Widely To Help Animals?



Yes, it's used across the world by animal owners, trainers, breeders, veterinarians, zoo keepers and animal rescue centres.

How Can Ttouch Help Your Dog With Training?



If a dog is anxious for whatever reason s/he will find it difficult to learn. Whether your dog is nervous, over-confident, timid or excitable, then it can help calm, relax and help your dog to be in a better frame of mind to learn.

Here's a couple of video's showing more about how Tellington Ttouch can help dogs.



Leading Tellington Ttouch practitioner Sarah Fisher



Tips on using Tellington Ttouch to help dogs who pull on their lead



If you'd like to learn more about Tellington Ttouch for your dog, why not attend a workshop? There are many across the country. For help locating one or to find a practitioner near you please do get in contact.

Remember.. With any issue it's important to get professionally qualified help. There are many qualified Tellington Ttouch practitioners around the world. Always seek their help first, to avoid the technique being used incorrectly.

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How To Relieve Your Dog's Allergies

How To Stop Your Dog Being Affected By Allergies



Does your dog get affected by allergies during the year? My dogs seem more prone when:
  • the trees are out in blossom,
  • grass starts growing a lot
  • hedges and other plants are in bud, and
  • when many crops start to grow.

Do you recognise these as triggers for your dog's allergies?

Of course if your dog gets severe symptoms. For instance itchiness or running eyes, then getting professional Veterinary advice is essential. But a holistic approach can be helpful. Both to prevent and treat allergies. Here's some tips on how.

1. Prevention Is Better Than Cure For Dog Allergies

The immune system can help protect the body from bacteria, viruses, and fungi to avoid infectious diseases. However, in the case of allergic diseases, the immune system mistakenly attacks against harmless substances, like pollen or certain foods, which actually hurts the body. A healthy immune system is more able to "turn off" and "turn on" to protect the body. Whilst minimising allergic reactions.

Tip #1 - Make sure your dog's immune system is healthy as possible through good nutrition and care. Use high quality supplements if required to help!

2. Avoid the Problem

Ok - so this may seem a bit defeatist!

However, if you know specifically what causes your dog to get an allergic reaction, and you can realistically avoid it. For instance by walking somewhere different for a few weeks, then do it. Of course this may not be practical. But is worth considering.

Tip #2 - Think how you can reduce the exposure to the allergens

3. Veterinary Homeopathy

There's dozens of different homeopathic preparations that can be used to help with a variety of ailments, including allergies. A qualified veterinary surgeon who has specialised in homeopathy will be able to help you with this natural approach.

Tip #3 - Have a Consultation With a Homeopathic Veterinary Surgeon

4. Reduce the Problem

If you've taken your dog for a walk and you've been where there is pollen about and which normally causes itchiness. Or other allergic symptoms, then:

  1. Wash his/her paws off when you get back.
  2. Use a damp towel to wipe over his/her coat.

Both of these can reduce the amount of pollen that's left on your dog, to minimise the allergic reaction.

Likewise, give your dog (or other animal) a good groom to help promote skin health.

Tip #4 - Care For Your Dog's Skin To Reduce The Irritation

What Do I Do?
My own dog (and horses) have Aloe Vera and Bee Pollen supplements daily to help promote a healthy immune system, and I find they do help. Research has taken place proving the efficacy of Bee Pollen on horse health. Read more here.

If you'd like your dog (or other animal) to discover these. Then please email me for details.

Remember as with any ailment it's important to get Veterinary advice before using a therapy to help. Remember too that what works with one animal may not necessarily work with another.

Find out more about these and other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How To Help Relieve Equine Back Pain

Soothing Equine Back Pain With Natural Therapies


The horse's back is amazing! Not only can we ride our horses, but we can gallop, jump as well as exercising at a more leisurely pace.

However, the equine back is relatively inflexible, and given the demands that we put on our horses, the back is constantly under strain. Many horse-owners will have heard of "the backman", but in reality this is not actually a therapy - the term "backman" can cover a multitude, some good some not so!

In this blog, I'm focussing on some of the most popular therapies used to help the equine back.

Equine Muscle Release Therapy



This therapy has developed from the Bowen Technique that is used on humans. An Australian - Tom Bowen developed this technique for humans during the 20th century, so is fairly new and it wasn't until 1990 that an Australian, Alison Goward began to use a variation of the technique on horses. EMRT is the "official" Bowen technique for horses.

It can be used to help with strains (e.g. ligaments, tendons, muscles), skeletal problems and tension amongst other things.

Find out more here

Equine Bodywork



This therapy is based upon Equine Sports Massage however, it also utilises a variety of other massage techniques and other complementary therapies to help the horse. The treatment consists of a full body massage and stretching routines. Ideal for helping to maintain a healthy back.

Read more...

Trigger Point Therapy For Horses



This is sometimes called Myotherapy. Which literally means muscle therapy. It's a method for relieving pain based on the application of compression to trigger points in the body. Trigger Point Myotherapy (TPM) developed out of a method of pain relief developed in the U.S.A. by Dr. Janet Travell, M.D.

Trigger points are defined as hypersensitive locations in the muscles that cause pain in response to undue stress. They develop into tight bands or knots within the muscles. These bands or knots can cause the muscles to spasm, limit the movement of joints, and cause pain.

Trigger points often do not occur in the same location where the pain is felt. Instead the pain may occur some distance from the actual location of the trigger point. Ideal if there's a muscle tension.

Read more here

Equine Sports Massage



Equine sports massage is the therapeutic application of a variety of massage techniques. These are used to help increase circulation and range of motion, relieving muscle spasm/tension, enhancing muscle tone and improving the horse's stamina and overall performance.

Read more....

There's many other therapies that can be used to help equine back health. But hopefully the above gives an idea of some of the ways you can help your horse's back - naturally.

Other Ways To Help Your Horse's Back


Additionally, there's many ways to help prevent back problems for your horse. Including:
1. using the therapies above (or others) as a preventative method
2. having correctly fitting tack or rugs
3. good hoof balance.

Remember.. With any ailment it's important to get Veterinary advice before using a therapy to help. Consider too that what works with one horse may not necessarily work with another.

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

Herbal Skin Health For Pets

Care For Your Pet's Skin With Natural Herbs



Caring for our pet's skin to maintain its health can be difficult. Not least because you maybe overwhelmed on what products to choose. There's so many options to choose, with hundreds of different lotions and supplements available.

Following on from my previous blogs looking at skincare, this time I'm looking at some of the most popular herbal approaches to our pet's skin health.

Do herbal preparations actually work for our pets skincare?

Herbal Approaches for Your Pet's Skincare


There's several herbs available to help your pet's skin health. But do they work? In short, yes they can! But unfortunately there's not much (if any!) research readily available stating that herbs do help with skincare (for people or animals).

But it's worth saying that for any veterinary complementary therapies, although there is scarce scientific research. This is not though an indication that none work. It's more due to many other reasons, including the considerable expense of clinical trials. See more information on this at my research for natural animal healthcare page.

Find below an overview of some of the popular herbs available for your pet's skincare:

1. Aloe Vera For Pet Skincare



There are actually in excess of 400 different types of Aloe Vera. The most commonly used type is Aloe Barbadensis Miller. This is also considered to be the most potent and effective type.

It can be taken as a supplement or applied topically to the skin. Aloe vera can be used for dogs, cats, rabbits, horses and virtually any animal.

Does aloe vera really help pet skin health?

This research review at the Natural Medicine Journal provides an overview of some of ways research has suggested it does help. A key point is that not all Aloe Vera preparations are the same.

Note that research suggests stabilisation is vital. This is worth noting when you're seeing a plethora of different products available. They're not all the same!

I can say that I've used Aloe Vera skincare for my dogs, horses and other animals for many years. (And yes I do sell it, but I only do this because I believe in it and enjoy using it!).

Get more info on Aloe Vera at the International Aloe Science Council website

Email me at info @ taranet.co.uk if you'd like more information on my favourite Aloe products for pets and people.

2. Comfrey For Pets


This herb can be used as a supplement or for horses applied to the skin, (it should only be used topically to dogs).

Does it work?

There's research that suggests it does work with people. Click here for info on this medical study.

Comfrey does contain allantoin which is a substance that helps skin cells grow. And maybe partly why comfrey has a reputation for assisting in skincare.

3. Arnica For Animal Health


Arnica's one of the most popular homeopathic remedies. It can be found as a homeopathic "pill" or as a skincare lotion. Arnica's thought to be best for inflammatory skin conditions.

Read more about it in my blog post here.

4. Calendula For Pet Health


This is a member of the sunflower family, and has long been used for treating wounds - in both people and animals.

Calendula is sometimes mixed with comfrey to help with skincare too. It's thought to help with tissue repair and healing, which is why it's got a reputation for helping wounds.

You can get the herbs and make a tea, and once boiled and then cooled and strained, it can be put into a spray bottle and the dilution can be applied to the affected area. You can buy ready made preparations of Calendula too!

Finally…. There's several other herbs that are used for skincare, the above are some of the most popular. These provide an option to you if you prefer to use natural products.

Remember as with any skincare - herbal or otherwise, it's important to get Veterinary advice before using. Especially if your pet has an injury or other ailment. Remember what works with one animal may not necessarily work with another.

Find out more about dozens of natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How Holistic Therapies Help Pet Skincare

How Natural Animal Therapies Help Skincare



Good skin condition is not down to chance, a combination of factors will affect it. You can make a difference.

In this next natural skincare for pet health spotlight. Find out about some popular therapies for helping to promote skin health.

There's several complementary therapies that can be used to help your pet's skin health. These include:

Veterinary Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a system of healing which has been practised in China and other Far Eastern countries for thousands of years. The Chinese found that animals could benefit from acupuncture as well as humans. The treatment is similar in horses, cats and dogs who all respond well. In fact a whole range of animals today benefit from acupuncture, from pets to farm animals.

Helping skin health is just one of the benefits, read more about acupuncture here.

Animal Aromatics

Essential oils are concentrated, volatile extracts from the fruits, roots, seeds, gums and herbs of aromatic plants and trees. They possess properties that can help to restore balance and promote physical, psychological and spiritual wellbeing.

Bergamot is one essential oil that's often used to help with a range of skin irritations - including those caused by summer allergens.

Read more about animal aromatics here.

Veterinary Homeopathy

Homeopathy has been used for thousands of years and is based on the law of similars, i.e. a remedy is selected that will cause the same symptoms as the illness shown. This remedy is then diluted homeopathically and given in minute quantity , thus the immune system is stimulated by the same substance and fights the disease or illness.

Apis is a homeopathic remedy often used to help with insect bites & stings. But there are lots more! For advice have a consultation with a professionally qualified homeopathic veterinary surgeon. Read more here.

Herbal Animal Health

Herbs can have a variety of effects including - antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, sedative or stimulant. By being aware of each plant's properties, and used carefully the animal can be relieved of various symptoms or illnesses, with often few, if no side effects.

There are various herbs and plants that can be used to help skin health including - aloe vera, arnica, seaweed, rosemary, tea tree, plus many others. Read more about herbal remedies for animals here.


Massage For Dogs

An often overlooked benefit of massage is that it can be used to help improve the condition of your dog or horse (or other animal's) coat, and also skin health.

Read about massage for dogs here.

Find out more about these and other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

Top Grooming Tips For Healthy Pets

Our pet's skin is delicate and yet extremely resilient. But it needs to be cared for in order to retain its health.

Good skin condition is not down to chance.
A combination of factors will affect it, including:
  • disease
  • illness
  • poor nutrition
  • medication
  • everyday scrapes and injuries.

These all need to be managed to avoid causing skin ill-health.

Pet Skin Care Tips



Bathing

Now to help keep our dogs and other pets clean many of us will give them a bath. But they don't usually need to be bathed that often. It's important to keep baths to a minimum.

This is because bathing can increase the chance of developing dry, flaky skin, through the removal of natural oils.

If you're not sure how often your pet needs to be bathed, speak to your Veterinary Surgeon for advice. Particularly if your animal has a skin condition - you could inadvertently make it worse.

When you bathe your pet:


  • Use warm water;
  • Bathe in a warm place - not on cold day outside, or your pet could get a chill and is unlikely to enjoy the experience!
  • Use a mild shampoo - and as natural as possible with ingredients kind to your animal's skin.

Pet Grooming Product Tip:
You don't necessarily need to use a shampoo that is branded as being for dogs, horses, cattle (or whatever your animal is). For instance my favourite shampoo's are the Aloe Liquid Soap or Aloe Jojoba Shampoo in my Forever aloe range. (Please email me for ordering information!).

How To Dry Your Pet After Bathing?


Don't use a blow dryer - it's easy to have it too hot or too noisy for your animal, and also many won't like it - a bath should be an enjoyable experience, not a trauma!

Some professional showing producers will use blow dryers on horses or cattle tails, to get a "show-finish", but if it's a warm day then your animal will dry of quickly. & you can always brush tails afterwards to get them full and flowing!

After washing your horse or other livestock, putting a fleece or sweat rug will help them dry off without catching a chill.

Your dog can be dried gently with a clean towel.

Grooming Your Pet



Brush your animal regularly. Brushing improves circulation. And clean, unmatted fur will help your animal to regulate his/her temperature. Generally making him/her feel good and healthy.

Brushing also helps distribute the skin's oils around your animal's coat, and help promote a healthy shiny coat.

Trimming or clipping an animal's coat can be essential (e.g. for a horse being exercised in winter, a clip can help prevent chills developing through getting too hot and sweaty). But don't trim/clip more than you need to.

To help your animal's coat to be at the right length/thickness, there's nothing better than a good groom with a high quality brush, it will remove hair and should leave a healthy shiny coat.

If you're unsure about clipping/trimming, speak to a professional groom or your Veterinary Surgeon.


Massaging Your Pet As Part Of Grooming



Massaging your pet is an excellent way to help promote circulation and a healthy coat. If you're not sure how to safely massage your pet. Or the best techniques why not attend a massage for pet owners course. There are many short-courses for dog or horse owners, for instance.

Some brushes are promoted as having "massaging effect" but massage can be far more than this, so treat your animal to a proper massage - it's also great for bonding.

Find out more about massage and other natural animal therapies here at Taranet. Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here to explore!

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How Nutrition Can Help Your Pet To Have Healthy Skin

Why Nutrition Can Affect Your Pet's Skin Health



Importance of Your Pet's Skin Health



The skin - this is vitally important to all mammals, including your pet. Because:
  • it protects against the elements
  • retains moisture
  • helps regulate temperature
  • it's very resilient,

But the skin does need to be taken care of. Or it's easy to become cracked, dry, sore or have other signs of poor condition.

Good skin health is considered to reflect the overall health of a body, for our animals, having a good quality coat and skin shining with health is usually associated with good condition.

Did you know there's 3 layers to the skin?



(1) epidermis (outer layer);
(2) dermis (helps regulate temperature and is mostly made of collagen); and
(3) subcutis (fatty tissue that provides insulation and support to the skin).

Why Good Pet Nutrition?



Grooming is a popular way to help our animals skin & coats to look good. But grooming is only partly helpful. While it's of course important, good health - including that of the skin, starts from within.
& nutrition makes an enormous difference to overall health. So where to start to help the skin?

Unless we keep wild animals, then our animals are domesticated. There can be the presumption that the dietary needs are fully met through manufactured pet food given to us through the plethora of brands on sale in the supermarkets.

After all most (if not all!) animal feed brands say that they're good quality and offer balanced diets for our furry pals. But sometimes these foods are very different to what our animals would naturally eat.

So to think about a holistic diet, it's best to think about what our pets equivalent wild species would eat. As given the ability to roam and choose from a variety of food sources, many wild animals have naturally good skin health.

As you know differing foods have different types of vitamins and minerals, as well as being either fibrous, protein or carbohydrates. Ensuring our animals have a balanced diet with the vitamins and minerals needed to promote good health, including that of the skin is important.

Animal feed packaging will say what the ingredients and composition is of the food, but it may not be immediately obvious if what it says it has, is actually what your animal needs. Nor will it be often obvious if the ingredients are going to be easily digestible for your animal.

The increase in organic food for humans has not been equalled in the pet feed industry, although it is possible to find some organic pet food brands. But why organic, does it really make any difference? Some research has come out that says yes it does!

Early in 2016, some research in the British Journal of Nutrition was published that showed that there is a nutritional difference in organic foods. See here for more information.

But what if you can't get organic feed for your animal?

Raw, fresh and/or whole food is definitely preferable to processed food. By the very definition "processed" means that the food has undergone some change from its original state. Foods are usually processed for convenience or safety, but will often contain added salt, fat or sugars.

It's important to make the distinction between food processed for safety (e.g. milk that's pasteurised to eliminate bacteria) and food processed for convenience.....Ever wondered why some foods have really long best-before-dates? Sometimes they can only have these because they've got various additives to enable this to happen.

In the wild, animals would usually eat fresh foods - they wouldn't store it up for weeks or even months to return to, (squirrels being a notable exception of course with their nuts!).

Look out for feed for your animal which contains fresh ingredients. Look also at the other ingredients listed - the addition of unnecessary fats, carbohydrates or additives to an animal's diet, can lead to various health issues - including skin conditions.

An imbalance of vitamins and minerals in the body easily occurs if the diet is not varied and truly nutritious. Food allergies can also develop and manifest themselves as skin complaints.

Good nutrition can help improve your pet's skin health.



A diet with the necessary balance of essential fatty acids, proteins and anti-oxidants can be useful.

Before changing your animal's diet, do speak to your Veterinary Surgeon for advice (especially if your animal has got an illness or ailment!). Also many horse or dog feed companies have nutritionists you can call on a helpline for advice.

There are many Vets throughout the UK and worldwide who specialise in holistic approaches. For help finding a holistic vet near you, please email info@taranet.co.uk.

So before you reach for a skin lotion or supplement, first review what your animal is eating. Although some skin care products and supplements are wonderfully helpful, and indeed can be necessary to help keep skin in tip-top condition.

If you don't help keep your pet healthy from the inside, the skin on the outside will always be compromised.

I hope you've found this article helpful for your pet. To get more information on dozens of other complementary therapies for your animal, please have a look through the rest of this website.

Or read other articles in this Natural Pet Health Blog. Take a look at the sitemap here.

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How Homeopathy Can Help Your Pet's Arthritis

How Homeopathy Can Help Your Pet's Arthritis



Did you know that osteoarthritis is a condition that affects not only people but a wide range of animals? Horses, dogs, cats and other animals can all be affected.

Although it's often associated with pets (& people) who're older. It can affect pets of any age. Those younger pets who have arthritis may have suffered injury or have a conformational issue though.

What is Veterinary Homeopathy?



Homeopathy should not be confused with herbal remedies. This is because homeopathic medicine uses not only plants but also mineral and animal sources.

Homeopathy has been used for thousands of years and is based on the law of similars, i.e. a remedy is selected that will cause the same symptoms as the illness shown.

This remedy is then diluted homeopathically and given in minute quantity , thus the immune system is stimulated by the same substance and fights the disease or illness.

Veterinary homeopathy, is the application of this complementary animal therapy within veterinary practice. Horses, dogs, cats and many other animals - large or small can all have homeopathic medicine. The amount to give will depend on the size of the animal. The remedies usually come in different potencies, plus it depends on the ailment and the pet as to how much to give.

How can homeopathy help with your pet's arthritis?



There are dozens of types of homeopathic medicine that can be used for a variety of ailments. The best one will depend on the pet.
Rhus Tox is often used for helping with osteoarthritis. But there are many other homeopathic medicine that maybe more suitable. The best one will depend on your animal's individual circumstances - e.g. is the joint stiffness better for exercise or rest, or is it better in cold weather or hot weather?

To get the best benefit out of homeopathy, have a consultation with a Veterinary Surgeon who's qualified in homeopathy. There are many throughout the UK and Ireland who're members of the British Association of Homeopathic Veterinary Surgeons - http://www.bahvs.com

As with all therapies and treatments - use only those that your Veterinary Surgeon approves. Whilst homeopathy is generally very safe, there maybe some reasons why it won't be suitable for your horse, dog or other animal. It may not even work properly if your animal is on other medication, so do get your Veterinary Surgeon's permission first.

I hope you've found this article helpful for your pet. To get more information on dozens of other complementary therapies for your animal, please have a look through the rest of this website. Take a look at the sitemap here.

About the Author

Suzanne Harris is founder of this Taranet website at www.taranet.co.uk, and also provides business coaching to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.

How To Help Your Dog's Arthritis With Complementary Therapies

Natural Solutions To Canine Arthritis



Have you noticed your dog:

  • walking a bit slower?
  • not wanting to walk so far?
  • finding it difficult to climb stairs?
  • reluctant to jump in the car?
  • not sleeping so well?
  • not wanting to be groomed, particularly around the handles?

Of course there can be many reasons for this. However, it could be arthritis. This is common. And can happen to any dog, especially as they get older. Although not all dogs who get it, are older. Even younger ones can, especially if they've been injured.

You may not realise that small changes in your dogs behaviour are as a result of arthritis. But it can build up until something very obvious happens. Such as your dog not being able to stand, and wobbling about.

When it gets to this stage it is NOT too late to help! There are many complementary therapies and supplements you can use to help your dog. Whether it's the early stages of arthritis, or more advanced.

Many therapies can be used alongside supplements and medications too.

Popular therapies for canine osteoarthritis include:



Hydrotherapy - Water can be soothing, so helping to relieve pain. Swimming and working on the aqua treadmill are also great exercise. Useful for maintaining fitness. As swimming is non-weight-bearing, it's useful for dogs who find too much walking around strenuous.There’s several ways that your dog can have a hydrotherapy session. These include:

  • Swimming in the sea or river
  • Swimming in a special hydrotherapy pool for dogs.
  • Aqua Treadmill
  • Cold water hosing or bucket
  • Hot water hosing or bucket

The amount of hydrotherapy needed to help with osteoarthritis will vary. Each animal is different. Some animals will need at least weekly sessions. Others every month or longer.

Why not use the sea or a river? This may not be practical – making sure the water is safe (clean and not too fast flowing or rough) is essential. So using a professional hydrotherapy pool maybe more practical.

There’s small canine hydrotherapy pools around the UK, and in many other countries too. A professionally-run pool will mean that the water will be a good temperature. This is very important to make it as comfortable and therapeutic as possible.

Or using either a bucket of cool or warm water, or a hose flowing cool or warm water, can help. An easy way to use hydrotherapy at home for your dog. But won’t offer the same exercise benefits of a treadmill or hydrotherapy pool. Although your dog may feel some relief.

As with all therapies and treatments. Use only those that your Veterinary Surgeon approves. Whilst hydrotherapy is generally very safe. There’s some reasons why it won’t be suitable for all dogs. So do get your Veterinary Surgeon’s permission first.

Physiotherapy - Veterinary physiotherapy is a very popular natural way to help maintain and improve mobility. It can be used to soothe aching joints and ease tense muscles.

A qualified veterinary physiotherapist will use a variety of techniques to help your dog. This includes massage, electrotherapy, magnotherapy, TENS, infra-red and more.

Read more about what to expect from physiotherapy for dogs, with my article here.

There are of course several other therapies that can be used to help. And supplements too. Ask your veterinary surgeon for advice. Depending on what your dog's individual needs are, will mean some therapies will be more beneficial than others.

I'll talk more about supplements for canine arthritis in a future blog post.

But remember, that what works for one dog, will not necessarily work for another. But likewise, give a therapy or supplement time. Don't expect a miracle overnight result! Particularly if your dog is older, and the arthritis is chronic, regular sessions maybe required.

Find more information on animal arthritis and complementary therapies in my advice page here.

What About Research Into Benefits of Complementary Animal Medicine?



Find links to lots of veterinary research, including benefits of natural therapies for arthritis, with my research page here.

About The Author

This article has been written by Suzanne Harris, who is the developer of this Taranet Complementary Therapies for Animals website. And also business coach to horse and dog care and veterinary professionals.